Enter a Private Luxury Treatment Center Within 24 Hours
Call Now 1-888-744-0789 100% Private

Enter a Private Luxury Treatment Center Within 24 Hours

Click to Call 1-888-744-0789

Snorting OxyContin Side Effects and Dangers

OxyContin tablets are meant to be swallowed, as directed by a doctor, at a very specific and controlled rate. However, people who are addicted to OxyContin might be tempted to crush those pills and snort them, bringing the active ingredient in the drug into contact with the delicate blood vessels that line their nasal passages. If this is something you’re accustomed to doing, or you know someone who abuses OxyContin in this way, this article is for you. As you’ll see here, taking the drug in this way is far from safe.

Eroding Nasal Passages

It’s well known that snorting cocaine can lead to significant nasal passage damage. That drug causes blood vessels to constrict, and when starved of the nutrients blood can deliver, tissues can quickly shrivel up and die. There is some evidence that suggests that people who snort opioids like OxyContin can suffer the same kind of damage. For example, according to an article in the Journal of Medical Toxicology, a woman who had been snorting Percocet developed serious nasal tissue damage as a result, and she wasn’t even aware that the damage had taken place. She complained only of a headache. You could develop much the same kind of damage, and you might also not even know that the damage had taken place.

Could You Have Damage?

Signs of nasal passage damage can include:

  • Frequent nosebleeds
  • Changes in the sound of your voice
  • Reduced ability to smell
  • Changes in your profile or the way you look

New Formulas and New Challenges

New formulas of OxyContin have hit the market, and they’ve been amended in ways that might make the pills harder to crush and snort. The pills are coated with a plastic-like substance that may look shiny and firm when it’s dry, but it might turn into a sticky, semi-solid, gooey mess when it is exposed to water. According to a study in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 92 percent of people who were given these new pills were unwilling to snort them, as they felt the particles weren’t small enough to make it into their nasal passages safely. Those who do snort the particles may be in for a nasty surprise, as the drug may turn into jelly in the moist environment of the nose.

There are few, if any, published reports of people who have developed chronic nasal blockages from snorting OxyContin, likely because so few people do so. But if you choose to snort the drug, you could develop a plug inside your nasal passages of this sticky substance, and that could lead to sinus issues. It’s not a chance worth taking.

We Can Help

Finding the right place to help you overcome an addiction can be frightening and a little overwhelming. We can help. We have a detailed list of the best private inpatient or outpatient facilities that provide addiction care, and we’re adept at matching people to the right kinds of programs that can help them recover. We’d like to help you too. Please call our toll-free line to speak to a counselor and get the process started.